cave man cabbage soup

Added some organic chicken broth, organic parsley, and big giant fresh garlic leaves and stems from my garden

I found a recipe for a nice cabbage soup for the cave man diet.  Here’s what I did with it:

Ingredients:

2-3 Tbsp. olive oil

1/2 a large onion (optional)

four cloves of garlic

about half a small head of organic cabbage, chopped into bite-sized chunks

three stalks of organic celery, chopped into bite-sized chunks

organic rainbow chard, torn into large chunks

package of organic Canadian bacon, cut into bite-sized chunks

one organic sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin, cut into bite-sized chunks

water

“real salt”

kelp sprinkles if you like the look of “pepper”

Heat the garlic and the onion in the olive oil and saute’ for a minute or two.  Add the chopped cabbage, celery, and sweet potato.  Add a cup or two or three of water, depending on what looks right.  The chard and Canadian bacon can be added after the other ingredients have begun to soften.  Continue to simmer on low heat for half an hour to an hour, covered, checking in on it every so often.

When I made this I was so delighted with its look, its taste, everything about it.  It was gone in two meals.

A day later I made it again with some organic chicken sausage, olive oil, garlic, the rest of my head of cabbage, more celery, carrots, chard, and spinach.  This was just as good.  It seems that almost any variation on the theme might work.

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About Susan Bame

Writer, Mediator, Facilitator, Teacher, fascinated with indigenous forms of conflict resolution. I love watching people become empowered. I have a master's degree in conflict resolution and a personal interest in organic food, detoxing and healing the body, alternative holistic approaches to health, self-empowerment and win-win solutions through mediation, Structured Water™, and energetic healing. I lived on the Omaha Reservation in northeast Nebraska for ten years, worked with Native families in the area, and have a great interest in Native history, culture, practices, traditions, stories, and current affairs. View all posts by Susan Bame

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